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  • One Pocket Theory

    Revised 11/9/2012

    To start with I would like to say that I feel gratified to be part of the pool-playing brotherhood (past, present and future), who feel as passionately as I do, as to the absolute magnificence of the game of One Pocket. I think that One Pocket is one of the very greatest games/sports in the world, and all pool players who come to understand, appreciate, and seriously play One Pocket are blessed.....and it’s a shame that outside of our small One Pocket subculture, no one in the outside world even knows that there is a game called One Pocket, and how significant as a challenging/complex/fascinating sporting endeavor it is.

    Starting out about 47 years ago, I first watched and studied many of the great One Pocket players of that time: Ronnie Allen, Jersey Red, Johnny Ervolino, Boston Shorty, Harold Worst, etc...then, just after that, when I was 19-25 yrs.old, living and growing up in (the pool halls of) Chicago, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to watch Artie Bodendorfer (one of the best One Pocket players of all time, and a master of defensive One Pocket play) and Leonard 'Bugs' Rucker play many, many times - and this was at the time when Artie was playing his very best....and Chicago was also a bank pool mecca back in the 60's-70's, enabling me to play with, and learn from, great bank pool players like Bugs, Youngblood, Tough Tony, Freddie the Beard, etc. etc....then, in the ensuing 40-45 years since that time, I’ve both watched and played One Pocket against: Grady, Jack Cooney, Cliff Joiner (many times), Bugs (many times), Steve Cook, Alan Hopkins, Cornbread Red, Miami, Buddy Hall, Nick Varner, Efren, Jose Parica, Alex Pagulayan, Rodolfo Luat, Santos, Shannon D. Jeremy Jones, Rafael Martinez, Billy Palmer, and many more top players both past and present.

    So, with the knowledge gained from 47 years of intently studying the game of One Pocket and it's top players, along with having countless gambling sessions/tournament matches against shortstop to top speed players myself (and having won my share of them), combined with my own strategy analysis, shot formulating, and overall visualizing of the game, I feel very strongly that I have ascertained the optimum methodology for playing the game of One Pocket at it's highest level....and I have, and currently do, teach/give One Pocket lessons according to my concept of the game, including having given lessons to two of the top 20 One Pocket players in the world today....also, for the record, my One Pocket teaching, knowledge and visualizing of the game were highly spoken of by George Fels in one of his Billiards Digest 'tips and shafts' columns several years ago.

    Okay, first off I want to say that I’ve been annoyed for years by all of this clueless debating about which is right, or better, the supposed Chicago/Philly/East coast, strong defense/low risk/squeeze style of One Pocket - or the so-called modern/left coast/aggressive/fire at your hole style of One Pocket...Well, the two reasons this foolish debate annoys me are these...#1. I think this constantly parroted claim of there being a rigid geographic distinction re. the two styles of play, is untrue...and #2. Because this ongoing debate speaks as if these are the only two philosophies of One Pocket play to subscribe to...when in fact, playing just one of either of these two styles, is not playing optimum One Pocket – why in the world would anyone want to limit theirselves to just one of those styles, rather than employing the full spectrum of productive One Pocket play?...meaning...The only correct way to play One Pocket is within a matrix whereby you are at all times ready and able to draw upon either of those two styles ---> aggressive-relentless-offense or lockdown-trapping defense - or a melding of both them - all depending on each specific game/inning situation...

    When playing/thinking at the very highest level of one pocket, you will have a complete understanding and comfort level with both of those two 'styles' in your head to choose from, or combine – and deciding which of these style's to employ, will be correctly analyzed and determined in every different inning/individual shot of yours, when at the table.

    And know that to play top speed one pocket, you need to, #1. Have a very high level of creativity/imagination/vision to be applied to all phases of the game...#2. You must be an excellent banker, proficient at all one rail and multi-rail banks - along with having a locked-in muscle memory for hitting banks at precisely 'pocket-speed'...#3. You need to have extensive knowledge of kick shots, combination shots, carom shots, carom angles, deflection angles, and multi-rail billiard angles.

    Your shot choice should always be predicated on your correct analysis of several factors - the primary ones being: Table layout, ball score, match score, pocket size, table conditions - and also the One Pocket playing style, knowledge, skill set, heart, and ego tendencies of your opponent....and of course, all shot choices must factor in your own skill set/ability.

    The first thing that I tell a new One Pocket student of mine is that I will sum up my conception of how I believe correct One Pocket should be played, and what your dual-objective should be at all times, in one sentence:

    Unrelenting smart, well-calculated, aggressive offensive attacking, and/or, precise, suffocating, lock-down safety play...

    In other words, every time that you step to the table (unless you have an obvious ball to make, or you're in a trap) you should be determinedly, unrelentingly, looking to attack...but if you can’t find a viable offensive shot of any type, then you don’t force
    the issue – that’s where the smart part comes in…..Instead, you play a suffocating safety/put your opponent in a trap - this most often meaning: leaving your opponent frozen against a ball or balls so that he has nothing but negative or low percentage shot options available to him...and if that’s not possible, then you at least will re-position the ball layout in some way that helps your cause - i.e. move balls as close as possible to your pocket, or move balls from near his pocket or on his side of the table over to your pocket's side of the table, or tie up balls on his side, or open up balls and banking/shooting lanes on your side of the table - and/or leave him facing balls from a snookered position, jacked up, or with an awkward angle...and while doing any of this, if possible always endeavor to leave the cueball frozen on the rail - don‘t under-value this - it severely limits your opponents options and execution when he can only address the top of the cueball...

    And also, know this...

    One Pocket is very often not about having the opportunity to pocket a ball, run balls, bank a ball in, or shoot appealing, gratifying power shots...you must also give total-focus attention to the countless 'small shots' of One Pocket - and have the limitless patience, desire and work ethic required to do this...meaning that, there will be many many games, where you have nothing else available to you for 5, 10, or 15 straight innings other then to bunt balls, or to glance the cueball off of balls to have it only travel a few inches - but to a very specific place...and when you are in those types of situations -> you should patiently and intently shoot these 'seemingly' simple little shots as perfectly as you possibly can every time, striving to gain a strategic edge on your opponent in these intense miniature battles...

    And let me also stress this...before playing any important safety, it's crucial to analyze precisely, the very best place to leave the cueball in order to leave your opponent in the toughest possible return shot position...that said..before you shoot, whenever this can't be accurately determined from your shooting position..walking over to where you are thinking of leaving the cueball, and correctly envisioning your opponent's responding options is something that you should always do.

    Now I’m a big NFL fan, and as such, I’ve always drawn some parallels in my mind between One Pocket and pro football/One Pocket players and pro football quarterbacks.....football teams have to score (with a variety of plays, like One Pocket's variety of shots) and they
    have to defend...and they also play the score = playing safe (running the ball) when being a fair amount ahead, and conversely going for lower% but high yield plays when behind - just like One Pocket...and quarterbacks have to read the field like we read the table and then make a decision to act…and their ‘opponent’ is the cornerbacks, safeties, and linebackers - so, like we One Pocket players analyze our opponents skill set and tendencies, a quarterback needs to know the tendencies/abilities of different defensive backs and the defensive schemes being used against him…..Now a young quarterback who throws 25-30 picks in a season from forcing passes into double coverage, or not correctly reading the defense, is just like the overly aggressive young One Pocket player, who much too often goes for risky, low percentage shots, misses them and sells out…..To keep my football analogy going, if you want to play One Pocket at the highest level and as it should be played - just play it the way Joe Montana played quarterback back in the day - or like Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, and Aaron Rodgers play nowadays - very, very smart.

    Ok, back to shot choices…Your first desired shot choice is of course to make a ball in your pocket…now if you have the opportunity to pocket a ball, and the shot is not a ‘hanger’ - then whether you should choose to shoot this shot in a given situation will depend partially on all of the factors that I mentioned a few paragraphs earlier - but it will primarily be based on two factors: the ‘makeability’ percentage of the shot and the risk/reward equation - of which there are countless variations….obviously there’s no time here to go into this completely, covering all of the countless percentages and risk/reward probabilities - but for an example, here are a few interesting risk/reward comparisons interconnected with the makeability factor - and we'll use mathematical/strategic-One Pocket-thought-processing in considering the following situations:

    Ok, hypothetically, we have two (evenly matched) players going to 8, tied up 2-2 in games and playing the final game of their tournament race to three...in these first two situations the ball score is 0-0.…..In this first scenario, you have a shot that you are 85% likely to make in your pocket – and after making it, there are two more available balls for you to run (easy to run) - but only two - and, you will leave three sure balls for your opponent to pocket if you miss - but no more than three…...In the second scenario, you have a shot that you are 60% likely to make in your pocket, but you will be able to easily run four more balls if you make it, and leave just one ball for your opponent to pocket if you miss…..In each of these two situations I would say going for the shot is a good risk/reward choice....and also, I think the two very different ball-count situations are fairly equal choices when compared to each other viability-wise.......For our third and final situation, the ball score is 3-3....the shot that you have to pocket has an 80% makeability rating for you, but there are no other balls for you to make afterwards - you can only get one - and you will leave your opponent a sure two balls if you miss...should you shoot the shot in this situation?....it's a tougher choice to make this time.

    Anyway, this is an overview of some of my concepts of playing One Pocket correctly. To go further, we would need many hours of discussion, and we would also need to be on a table, to, among other things, analyze dozens of very specific game situations, in - early, middle, and endgame. Anyone who would like to contact me re. this manifesto, or to inquire about lessons - you can e-mail me at ghosttown@inbox.com.

    - One Pocket Ghost
    Last edited by One Pocket Ghost; 11-10-2012, 01:50 AM.
    jrhendy: Ghost does come up with shots that others don't see.

  • #2
    You won't get an argument from me on what you posted--all good high quality stuff. One thing that does stick in my mind that was mentioned is playing to your opponent. I see it all the time where players fail to adjust their game according to their opponent.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ghost, you already know I agree with you pretty much point to point. The interesting thing to me about all this discussion is that the gist of it is ticked off in the "One Pocket Primer" that I wrote here on OnePocket.org:

      http://onepocket.org/getting_started.htm

      That said, although the basic "concepts of One Pocket" are fairly clearly described in that primer, of course there is more the game than that, and there is at least one major principle that is not mentioned in that primer. That is for another day

      I also think that different players have different styles that work best for them -- right down to particular shots that one player hits well and gets a lot out of, that another player would avoid. I think of all pool games, One Pocket is the one that affords the most different kinds of successful styles. It truly does work for some players to focus a lot more on defense than offense, and for other players the other way around.

      Whatever else could be said about One Pocket, is there a player among us that doesn't feel like they really get a thinking workout every time they play for a few hours? You gotta love this game!
      "One Pocket, it's an epidemic and there ain't no cure."
      -- Strawberry Brooks

      Comment


      • #4
        Having spent a few years in Chicago myself, I can vouch for the Ghost's quality as a "teacher" and an adversary. He certainly does practice what he preaches, playing the smart aggresive style he describes to a T. Being in Boston now, I really miss the opportunities that halls like Chris's in Chicago offer for one-pocket action.
        As for the current discussion, I would like to add that while I believe that there are some basic principles in one-pocket, such as when to go for a shot, when to play a safety, when to take a foul, etc., this rules are often bent, very appropriately, by the top players and shortstops. Being very safe with the cueball can work well against an overly aggressive player who can't stand going more than 3 innings without shooting at a ball. These players often self-destruct when faced with an opponent playing a Chicago style game of one-pocket. On the other hand, as someone who likes to think of himself as playing a Chicago style game of one-pocket, it's still difficult for me to watch an opponent take a "stupid" shot, make it and then run 4 more when they "should" have played safe. The lesson here is that, more often that not, the correct shot for your opponent is not the correct shot for you. If your opponent consistently takes "stupid" shots and makes them, then these shots are not really "stupid" for him at all. Anyone who's ever been to the DCC and been matched up with a pro in the tourney knows what I'm talking about. Heck, most of the time I even prefer to bank a ball than take a long straight in. Knowing your own limitations as a pool player is key to being an excellent one-pocket player. This isn't really true in other games like 8- or 9-ball, as there are so many fewer choices every time a player steps up to the table, which is why one-pocket is such a fascinating game. The best players learn the rules, and then spend the rest of their lives figuring out when to break these same rules. Learn it all and then go beyond.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have had the attached copy of the ghost theory on one pocket in my favorites list on my computer for several yrs. While I like this approach and the structure that it provides, in 2019, it is very different from the way the ppv matches involving today's top players are playing the game. Today's top players will take the first available offensive shot in many instances and, without getting into a discussion of shooters,/movers, do not appear to play the score in the manner of champions from yrs ago. The game has certainly changed.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by stedyfred View Post
            I have had the attached copy of the ghost theory on one pocket in my favorites list on my computer for several yrs. While I like this approach and the structure that it provides, in 2019, it is very different from the way the ppv matches involving today's top players are playing the game. Today's top players will take the first available offensive shot in many instances and, without getting into a discussion of shooters,/movers, do not appear to play the score in the manner of champions from yrs ago. The game has certainly changed.
            Fred...thanks, I'm glad you liked and saved what I wrote, but I have to disagree with you (and anyone else) as to you saying categorically that "The game has certainly changed"... =...

            imo.....For a certain % of pro players playing One Pocket the game may have changed, in that they will shoot more offensively - but that is because their ball pocketing skill-set is high enough that for them, the world's best ball pocketers, the all important risk/reward ratio gives them, a green light to shoot those not-free, not easy-to-make, offensive shots...however...

            ...for the other 99% of One Pocket players, the game hasn't, and shouldn't change...players like myself, excellent One Pocket players from this site like: Dr. Bill, John Henderson, Jerry Matchin, Robert Newkirk, Bernie P., Wayne & Rich in L.A., Tom Wirth, Frank Almanza, etc. are certainly not playing the game in any new "changed way"....the 5 best One Pocket players in Chicago, including Chris Gentile don't play One Pocket in any new "changed way"...the young up-and-coming One Pocket players in Chicago, don't play in any new "changed way"....and neither do the many strong players from other cities that I know personally play in any new "changed way"....and this is because all of the above mentioned players can't, don't and shouldn't play in a "new changed way" - because they don't have the premiere ball pocketing skills of the world's best players.

            - Ghost

            P.S. Fred, you posted up the old version (from 12 years ago) of my One Pocket theory document...in the following post I'm going to post up the newer version of it, that has some things added, and points stressed...that's the version that players should read.
            Last edited by One Pocket Ghost; 10-27-2019, 08:14 PM.
            jrhendy: Ghost does come up with shots that others don't see.

            Comment


            • #7
              I repost this every few years, so that all of the new members that are here to learn the game, can read it, and download it if they wish...I give a printed copy of it to anyone taking lessons from me...it's a condensed version of my One Pocket philosophy/teachings ----->


              Originally posted by One Pocket Ghost View Post
              To start with I would like to say that I feel gratified to be part of the pool-playing brotherhood (past, present and future), who feel as passionately as I do, as to the absolute magnificence of the game of One Pocket. I think that One Pocket is one of the very greatest games/sports in the world, and all pool players who come to understand, appreciate, and seriously play One Pocket are blessed - and it’s a shame that outside of our small One Pocket subculture, no one in the outside world even knows that there is a game called One Pocket, and how significant of a challenging/complex/fascinating sporting endeavor it is.

              Starting out in the late 1960's, I first watched and studied many of the great One Pocket players of that time: Ronnie Allen, Jersey Red, Bugs, Boston Shorty, Harold Worst, etc...then, just after that, when I was 19-25 yrs.old, living and growing up in (the pool halls of) Chicago, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to watch, up close and personal, Artie Bodendorfer (one of the best One Pocket players of all time, and a master of defensive One Pocket play) and top-speed One Pocket player Leonard 'Bugs' Rucker play many, many times - and this was at the time when Artie was playing his very best....and Chicago was also a bank pool mecca back in the 60's-70's, enabling me to play with, and learn from, great bank pool players like Bugs, Youngblood, Tough Tony, Freddie the Beard, etc. etc....then, in the ensuing 45-50 years since that time, I’ve both watched and played One Pocket against: Grady, Jack Cooney, Cliff Joyner (many times), Bugs (many times), Steve Cook, Alan Hopkins, Cornbread Red, Miami, Bill Incardona, Buddy Hall, Nick Varner, Efren, Jose Parica, Alex Pagulayan, Rodolfo Luat, Santos, Shannon D. Jeremy Jones, Rafael Martinez, , Billy Palmer, and many more top players both past and present.

              So, with the knowledge gained from 50 years of intently studying the game of One Pocket and it's top players, along with having countless gambling sessions/tournament matches against shortstop to top speed players myself (and having won my share of them), combined with my own analysis, shot formulating, and overall visualizing of the game, I feel very strongly that I have ascertained the optimum methodology for playing the game of One Pocket at it's highest level....and I have, and currently do, teach/give One Pocket lessons according to my concept of the game, including having taught two of the top 25 One Pocket players in the world today....also, for the record, my One Pocket teaching, knowledge and visualizing of the game were highly spoken of by acclaimed Billiards Digest editor/columnist George Fels in one of his Billiards Digest 'tips and shafts' columns several years ago.

              Ok, I need to say that I’ve been extremely annoyed for years by all of this clueless, idiotic debating about which is right, or better, the supposed Chicago/Philly/East coast, strong defense/low risk/trapping/squeeze style of One Pocket - or the so-called modern/left coast/aggressive/ball running style of One Pocket...Well, the two reasons this foolish debate, and incorrect positing annoys me are these...#1. This constantly parroted claim of there being a rigid geographic distinction re. the two styles of play, is untrue...and #2. Because this ongoing debate speaks as if these are the only two philosophies/styles of One Pocket play to subscribe to...when in fact, playing just one of either of these two styles, is not playing optimum One Pocket – why in the world would anyone want to limit themselves to just one of those styles, rather than employing the full spectrum of productive One Pocket play...meaning ----->

              When playing/thinking at the very highest level of one pocket, the only correct way to play One Pocket is within a matrix whereby you are at all times during the game, ready and able to draw upon either of the two aforementioned styles: Relentless, aggressive, fear-inducing offense, or, lockdown, trapping, table-controlling, suffocating, precision-defense...deciding which of these style's to employ will be correctly analyzed and determined in every different inning/shot of yours when at the table...and whenever possible, like a master alchemist, you should forge both styles together on the same shot - thus creating - One Pocket Gold.


              Also, take note that to play top speed one pocket, you need to: #1. Have a very high level of creativity/imagination/vision to be applied to all phases of the game...#2. You must be an excellent banker, proficient at all one rail and multi-rail banks - along with having a locked-in muscle memory for hitting banks at precisely 'pocket-speed'...#3. You need to have extensive knowledge of kick shots, combination shots, carom shots, carom angles, deflection angles, and multi-rail billiard angles...and #4. You must have the strategic capabilities and mind set of a military General or a chess Grandmaster, and #5. You must be a Wizard of Odds.

              Your shot choice should always be predicated on the correct analysis of several factors - the primary ones being: Table layout, ball score, match score, pocket size, table conditions - and also the One Pocket playing style, knowledge, skill set, heart, and ego tendencies of your opponent....and of course, all shot choices must factor in your own skill set/abilities.

              So, all of that said, every time that you step to the table (unless you have an obvious ball to make, you have a significant ball-count lead in the game, or you're in a trap) you should be determinedly, unrelentingly, looking to aggressively attack...but if you can’t find a viable offensive shot of any type, then you don’t force the issue – that’s where the smart part comes in…..Instead, you play a suffocating safety/put your opponent in a trap - this most often meaning: leaving your opponent frozen against/behind a ball or balls so that he has nothing but negative or low percentage shot options available to him - or he is forced to take a scratch and lose a ball...and if that’s not possible, then you at least will re-position the ball layout in some way that helps your cause - i.e. move balls as close as possible to your pocket, or move balls from near his pocket or on his side of the table over to your pocket's side of the table, or tie up balls on his side, or open up balls and banking/shooting lanes on your side of the table - and/or leave him facing balls from a snookered position, jacked up, or with an awkward angle...and while doing any of this, if possible always endeavor to leave the cueball frozen on the rail - don‘t under-value this - it severely limits your opponents options and execution when he can only address the top of the cueball...

              Ok, more about moving, but on a smaller scale - often referred to as "simple shots"...but when given proper consideration, and then successfully executed - they're really not simple shots at all...

              One Pocket is very often not about having the opportunity to pocket a ball, run balls, bank a ball in, or shoot appealing, gratifying power shots...you must also give total-focus attention and respect to the countless 'small shots' of One Pocket - and you must have the limitless patience, desire and work ethic required to do this...meaning that, there will be many many games, where you have nothing else available to you for 5, 10, or 15 straight innings other then to bunt balls, or to glance the cueball off of balls to have it only travel a few inches - but to a very specific place...and when you are in those types of situations ---> you should patiently and intently shoot these 'seemingly' simple little shots as perfectly as you possibly can every time, striving to gain a strategic edge on your opponent in these intense, and often crucial, miniature battles...

              And let me also stress this...before playing any important safety, it's crucial to analyze precisely, the very best place to leave the cueball in order to leave your opponent in the toughest possible, return shot position - that said, before you shoot, whenever this can't be accurately determined from your shooting position, walking over to where you are thinking of leaving the cueball, and correctly envisioning your opponent's responding options is something that you should always do.

              Now I’m an NFL fan, and as such, I’ve always drawn some parallels in my mind between One Pocket and pro football/One Pocket players and pro football quarterbacks.....so obviously football teams have to score (with a variety of plays, like One Pocket's variety of shots) and also they have to defend against the other teams offensive attack.....and just like in One Pocket, football teams also, all importantly, play the score = they 'play safe' by running the ball and throwing short conservative passes when being a good amount ahead in the score...and conversely, by going for lower % but high yield plays when being a fair amount behind in the score......and quarterbacks have to read the field like we read the table and then make a decision to act…a quarterbacks ‘opponent’ is the cornerbacks, safeties, and linebackers - so, as a good One Pocket players should analyze his opponents skill set, mind set, and tendencies, a quarterback needs to know the tendencies/abilities of the different defensive backs and the defensive schemes being used against him…..and maturity is key - i.e. a young quarterback who throws 25-30 picks in a season, from forcing passes into double coverage, or not correctly reading the defense, is just like the overly aggressive young One Pocket player, who much too often goes for risky, low percentage shots, misses them too often and sells out…..I'll finish my football analogy by saying - if you want to play One Pocket at the highest level and as it should be played - just play it the way Joe Montana played quarterback back in the day - or like Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, and Aaron Rodgers play/have played in recent years - skillfully, but also, very, very smart.

              Back to shot choices…Your first desired shot choice of course, is to make a ball in your pocket.…but if you have the opportunity to pocket a ball, and the shot is not a ‘hanger’ - then whether you should choose to shoot this shot in a given situation will depend partially on all of the factors that I mentioned a few paragraphs earlier - but it will primarily be based on two factors: the ‘makeability’ percentage of the shot combined with the risk/reward equation - of which there are countless variations…obviously there’s no time here to go into this at great length, covering all of the countless percentages and risk/reward probabilities..but to cover this a little, here are a few interesting risk/reward comparisons interconnected with the makeability factor - and we'll use mathematical/strategic One Pocket-thought-processing in considering the following three situations...

              Let's say that hypothetically, you are one of two (evenly matched) players, playing in a One Pocket tournament....you are playing even - both going to 8balls, tied up 2-2 in games and playing in the all important final game of your tournament race to three. In this first situation the ball score is 0-0 and you have a shot that you are 85% likely to make in your pocket – and after making it, there are two more available balls for you to run (easy to run) - but only two - and, you will leave three sure balls for your opponent to pocket if you miss - but no more than three…...In the second scenario, the ball score is once again 0-0, and you have a shot that you are 50% likely to make in your pocket, but you will be able to easily run four more balls if you make it, and leave just one ball for your opponent to for sure pocket if you miss…In each of these two situations I would say going for the shot is a good risk/reward choice...and also, I think the two very different ball-count situations are fairly equal choices when compared to each other, viability-wise.......For our third and final situation, the ball score is 3-3....the shot that you are considering shooting has an 80% makeability rating for you, but there are no other balls for you to make afterwards - you can only get one - and you will leave your opponent a sure two balls if you miss...should you shoot the shot in this situation?....it's a tougher choice to make this time - maybe about a 50-50 choice.

              Anyway, this is an overview of some of my concepts of playing One Pocket correctly. To go further, we would need many, many hours of discussion, and we would also obviously, need to be on a table, to, among other things, analyze dozens of very specific game situations, re. early, middle, and endgame shots and strategies. Anyone who would like to contact me re. this manifesto, or to inquire about lessons - you can e-mail me at ghosttown@email.com.

              - One Pocket Ghost
              jrhendy: Ghost does come up with shots that others don't see.

              Comment


              • #8
                All I know, which isn’t much, is when I moved from the East coast to the Best coast, that there was a striking difference of play. When first sneaking into pool rooms, the guys playing with and around were Patch Eye, Bob Bolles, et all. Bank pool? You kidding? Kentucky, bank pool are
                synonymous. There was one other player that was around but I cannot remember his name but he has been classified as one of the greats. I learned from him at $.25 a shot. He would put up a shot and then bet me I could’ve make it and he could. It was more of expanding your mind and looking outside the box kind of thing, but the shots are still remembered.
                Anyway, Louisville style, 2 and duck, one and duck.
                Moved to California, you better be firing.
                This was a few years ago, 40, but who’s counting?
                I do think for the lesser players the game has evolved. More strategy, more safety play, less firing. A blending of the different styles. The reason is because more and more young people are taking up the game and want to play well.
                For the better, more superior players, it has always been for them, don’t leave a shot, game over.
                You have asked me to play many times but it is always even. I wish.
                Anyway, your matches with John were great matches and a roll in either direction would have produced different results.
                I know you will be in the HOF at Chris’s.
                When is the third edition of the John/Ghost? Or is it Ghost/John?
                Coyotes, Eagles, and Deer, oh my!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by twister View Post
                  Having spent a few years in Chicago myself, I can vouch for the Ghost's quality as a "teacher" and an adversary. He certainly does practice what he preaches, playing the smart aggresive style he describes to a T. Being in Boston now, I really miss the opportunities that halls like Chris's in Chicago offer for one-pocket action.
                  As for the current discussion, I would like to add that while I believe that there are some basic principles in one-pocket, such as when to go for a shot, when to play a safety, when to take a foul, etc., this rules are often bent, very appropriately, by the top players and shortstops. Being very safe with the cueball can work well against an overly aggressive player who can't stand going more than 3 innings without shooting at a ball. These players often self-destruct when faced with an opponent playing a Chicago style game of one-pocket. On the other hand, as someone who likes to think of himself as playing a Chicago style game of one-pocket, it's still difficult for me to watch an opponent take a "stupid" shot, make it and then run 4 more when they "should" have played safe. The lesson here is that, more often that not, the correct shot for your opponent is not the correct shot for you. If your opponent consistently takes "stupid" shots and makes them, then these shots are not really "stupid" for him at all. Anyone who's ever been to the DCC and been matched up with a pro in the tourney knows what I'm talking about. Heck, most of the time I even prefer to bank a ball than take a long straight in. Knowing your own limitations as a pool player is key to being an excellent one-pocket player. This isn't really true in other games like 8- or 9-ball, as there are so many fewer choices every time a player steps up to the table, which is why one-pocket is such a fascinating game. The best players learn the rules, and then spend the rest of their lives figuring out when to break these same rules. Learn it all and then go beyond.
                  While I agree with everything Ghost has to say about playing One Pocket, and I really like what Twister had to say in the above quote, I like to think about OP and my game (as well as how I evaluate others games) like this.

                  First off I am not addressing the pros or even some very top rated shortstops. I am addressing the people we play with everyday; I would say like most on this forum.

                  We all have a certain level of talent, or shooting ability (pocketing balls) at any given time. If you can picture this ability on a vertical scale, say marked from 0-10, and place yourself on this scale relative to others or your immediate opponent, then you can gage your chances of winning a match of ,say, NINEBALL. If you are fairly accurate in your assessment, you can fairly predict the outcome of the match if no spot is involved.

                  But, with OP you can play the game ABOVE your level of shooting talent on that scale by employing the other more subtle strategies of CB control, trapping, positioning balls, going up table, safe play, etc., etc. Thus, you can compete with more talented shooters who don't make as much use of those tactics.

                  OP is like football as Ghost says; it is also like baseball in that it is a game of percentages, and the better you judge risk/reward odds, the more realistic you are, the more success you will meet with.

                  If I am a 5 on the scale of shooting talent, by employing the better "moving game" I may be able to compete with 7's or 8's (that might be somebody who could give me the 7 and the 8 at nineball). No easier way to raise your level of play.

                  The other important thing about playing above the level of your shooting ability through the use of the moving game is you can control the table and your opponents play. As Twister infers above, if you haven't watched an opponent self destruct in frustration at never getting a good shot, then you haven't played your best OP.

                  The one problem you'll have to deal with though is "gophers don't like to play you if you play too smart"; games not fast enough for'em.

                  The early bird may get the worm...but the second mouse gets the cheese...Shutin@urholeisOVERATED.

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                  • #10
                    I was referring exactly to what you have stated ghost; the op players we see on the ppv matches Tony, Dennis, Danny S. for example play differently because of their excellent ball striking skills, considerably different from gr8 players from yrs back. We agree and take care.

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                    • #11
                      Mr Perry, very well written and as usual you are right on the money. Thanks for all your post over the years they offer a lot of great info. Keith

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by stedyfred View Post
                        I was referring exactly to what you have stated ghost; the op players we see on the ppv matches Tony, Dennis, Danny S. for example play differently because of their excellent ball striking skills, considerably different from gr8 players from yrs back. We agree and take care.
                        Ok Fred, great, I'm glad we got clarified ...and you take care too.

                        Originally posted by sappo View Post
                        Mr Perry, very well written and as usual you are right
                        on the money. Thanks for all your post over the years they offer a lot of great info. Keith
                        Thanks for sayin' Keith.


                        - Ghost
                        jrhendy: Ghost does come up with shots that others don't see.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by stedyfred View Post
                          I have had the attached copy of the ghost theory on one pocket in my favorites list on my computer for several yrs. While I like this approach and the structure that it provides, in 2019, it is very different from the way the ppv matches involving today's top players are playing the game. Today's top players will take the first available offensive shot in many instances and, without getting into a discussion of shooters,/movers, do not appear to play the score in the manner of champions from yrs ago. The game has certainly changed.
                          this quote is from ghosts manifest
                          The first thing that I tell a new One Pocket student of mine is that I will sum up my conception of how I believe correct One Pocket should be played, and what your dual-objective should be at all times, in one sentence:

                          Unrelenting smart, well-calculated, aggressive offensive attacking, and/or, precise, suffocating, lock-down safety play...


                          i dont think that has changed
                          just todays players might have a different idea of whats a
                          well-calculated, aggressive offensive attacking shot
                          just sayin

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