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Solo Practice vs competition

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Ike Runnels View Post
    Best practice is to play a better player
    No doubt this is true. I would also add that it’s beneficial to play opponents with different styles than your own.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Ike Runnels View Post
      Best practice is to play a better player
      I believe that the best practice is to play a better player... but there is more to it. When you compete against a superior player it is paramount that you attentively observe the skills which make him a better player.

      For instance, if it's shot selection or score management it is not necessary to practice these skills but to actually compete to gain the understanding of what shots to shoot and when to shoot. However, if it's multiple rail bank shots, kicking at object balls, or caroming the cue ball into the rack to leave your opponent without a makeable shot to name just a few... these shots must be put to practice. Just having the knowledge that your opponent can execute these shots is of no value to you until you put it into practice. And how long do you practice these shots... that would depend on how much you like your money.

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      • #18
        I have to practice a little or I swear I forget everything I thought I knew about basic ball pocketing lol.

        But I much prefer competition for sure! Only competition can get me the "high" from making a genuine good creative shot that turns or wins a game. That is what I play for even more than the $$.

        And it is good to play players that you really have to play hard to win. So about even or a little better if you want to push yourself to improve -- to the degree that you can afford it of course
        "One Pocket, it's an epidemic and there ain't no cure."
        -- Strawberry Brooks

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J.R. View Post
          I believe that the best practice is to play a better player... but there is more to it. When you compete against a superior player it is paramount that you attentively observe the skills which make him a better player.

          For instance, if it's shot selection or score management it is not necessary to practice these skills but to actually compete to gain the understanding of what shots to shoot and when to shoot. However, if it's multiple rail bank shots, kicking at object balls, or caroming the cue ball into the rack to leave your opponent without a makeable shot to name just a few... these shots must be put to practice. Just having the knowledge that your opponent can execute these shots is of no value to you until you put it into practice. And how long do you practice these shots... that would depend on how much you like your money.
          ... and how long you can maintain good concentration when practicing. Because if you find yourself slipping into sloppy practice, in my opinion, bad practice is worse than no practice at all.
          "One Pocket, it's an epidemic and there ain't no cure."
          -- Strawberry Brooks

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          • #20
            Originally posted by NH Steve View Post
            ... and how long you can maintain good concentration when practicing. Because if you find yourself slipping into sloppy practice, in my opinion, bad practice is worse than no practice at all.
            I would assume if you find yourself having a "sloppy" (bad practice) session then your mindfulness to the repetition and improvement (performance skills) of specific pool shots is at issue. How many times has the question been raised, "What is the secret to playing great pool?" I maintain that the answer is "practice, practice, and practice." And through practice, we gain confidence and ultimately success.

            What do you do when your playing an opponent for some green and you lose repeatedly? Ordinarily, the losing player becomes noticeably "sloppy" in his thinking and execution of shots. The losing player has lost his "mindfulness."
            If the losing player cannot refocus with concentrated attention on every shot, then he should quit the game. The same with practice. Although pool tables are on four legs, they never walk away. Today's bad will be tomorrow's good.

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            • #21
              I like the Allen Iverson approach: "Practice, practice we're spending our time talking about practice."

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              • #22
                my 2 cents
                worth less than that...
                practice vs play to me has to do with where you are at with your skill level
                if you are still working on your stroke and fundamentals
                you need more practice and lessons
                if you think your stroke is where it needs to be
                you need to play and work on what loses you games
                jmho
                icbw

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                • #23
                  I think practice is no substitute for competing and gambling. If your goal is to play, say 4 or 5 hours a day, and do that 3 or 4 days a week, you will be happier with your game if that time was spent competing and gambling rather than practicing.

                  Particularly so with OP because the game is won not just by pocketing balls. Like in horseshoes, close counts. And moving and defense can play a great role in your overall success.

                  The fact that I hate practicing has nothing to do with this testimony, I promise.
                  The early bird may get the worm...but the second mouse gets the cheese...Shutin@urholeisOVERATED.

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                  • #24
                    Very well said I agree 100 percent what good is knowing strategy if you can’t excute you will never win!

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                    • #25
                      Some people play really well without practicing. Others I’ve seen that say they never practice...they play well in spurts but they have no consistency and still refuse lol.

                      I practice a lot myself and I think that a 3 or 4 to 1 ratio is perfect for me, unfortunately I don’t get that much action and it’s more like 8 to 1 practice time and I start to get frustrated and bored...then when I do play someone good it can be hard to get in stroke if I don’t jump right out ahead because I’m so used to long sessions where I’m always at the table.

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                      • #26
                        For me I would think it would depend upon what you want to achieve, what are your goals, who are you playing and what is their level.
                        For me, I started late @ 18, so I was way behind in years played as compared to McCready, Cole, Keith Thompson, Ernesto and the like, the child proteges, so I had to really practice.
                        I practice 7 hrs. a day and then went out at night to match up. So I probably practiced anywhere from 14 - 20 hrs. for every 1 hr of matching up. I practiced all disciplines of pool: straight pool, banks, one pocket, and nine ball.

                        I got lucky, for as Luther Lassiter stated; "if you want to get good at pool, practice on a 5 x 10"! That was always my table of choice.

                        Other than that I can not add to the already good advise the posters have offered up! Good Luck! Whitey

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                        • #27
                          Practice is like dieting to me.

                          I really really really want to do it, but never actually try it.

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                          • #28
                            I dont practice but I like to try different kinds of one pocket shots once in a while to see how the balls react.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ChicagoFats View Post
                              Practice is like dieting to me.

                              I really really really want to do it, but never actually try it.
                              Like anything else, you get out of it what you put into. As others have mentioned, just banging balls around is not productive. For me, its more than that, it is destructive to many of the things that I work on. PSR, head position, stroke, etc...

                              I would challenge any player that chooses action only to identify 2 areas of your game that need improvement. Find a drill on youtube or anywhere on the internet that addresses your specific issue and schedule just one 30 min practice session. If you start getting distracted work on the 2nd drill. If you are still distracted, go get a drink and relax for a few minutes and come back to it. The idea is to practice with purpose.

                              I expect you will see a improvement in the area you are working with just ONE session and it my even help you win your next session

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                              • #30
                                I only practice. Almost never get to play until I get out to one of our member events. Canada is not the land of One Hole. I generally play against myself and sometimes challenge myself like how many I can make from after the break (DCC style).
                                Regards,

                                Nick B

                                Name: Nick Beretanos
                                Location: Vancouver BC

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