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  • practice

    I have a hard time practicing this game by myself. I like to practice certain banks and common shots, its just that if i try to play a game by the end i am just whacking balls. I am a very high strung person but take my time on shots when I am in action. I am fairly new to this game, but am very excited about the game itself. What are some better ways to practice. I have read jack kohlers book and read winning one-pocket. Hard to find good oldschool 1hole players in central Iowa to learn from.
    Thanks .Troy

    I think it would be cool if this web site could somehow put a link on its web site to show one new shot a week. this would be low maint. You should also be able to see a backlog of old shots. There are so many variations to different shots it would be neat to see different approaches by different people. Just an Idea.

  • #2
    I try to practice on the shots that I'm having the most difficulties with, and then I get to where I can master them. Then, when they come up in games, they'll become a little bit easier. You will be a lot more confident with the shot.

    In one-pocket, you got to practice your banks, your two-railers, and sticking and holding the cue-ball behind balls.

    I've had my best results learning how to twist in the long-rail and short-rail banks. Those are very important shots to learn.

    I'm not sure of your level of play or how well you control your cue-ball, but it is very important to put it where you want to. Once you learn that, you will see those little drills will start taking effect.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by t-dog

      I think it would be cool if this web site could somehow put a link on its web site to show one new shot a week. this would be low maint. You should also be able to see a backlog of old shots. There are so many variations to different shots it would be neat to see different approaches by different people. Just an Idea.
      Well Troy, pretty much exactly that will indeed be coming soon. I am just working on the format -- I actually a ton of shots ready to put up as soon as I get the right format going...
      "One Pocket, it's an epidemic and there ain't no cure."
      -- Strawberry Brooks

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      • #4
        Watching some Accu-Stats 1pocket tapes is almost as good as practiciting. For strictly instructional purposes, I'd look for those with commentary by Icardonna and Grady.

        As to actual practice, that's a tough one, because so much depends upon what level of play you're at -- what I might practice might not be what you need to practice, so it's hard to say. 1pocket has so many shots that are
        peculiar to it… but for starters, here's five things you might try:

        Take two object balls and play some straight rail, just between the foot
        rail and the spot, making sure the cue ball dies just as it contacts the
        second ball. Besides speed control, what's important during this exercise
        is to play close attention to whether the thickness of hit you use off the
        first object ball produces your anticipated cue ball path. Too thick? Too
        thin? You're trying to build up a "data bank" of what you think is going to
        happen Vs what actually does happen, so that the next time the same angle or shot comes up, you can adjust for greater accuracy. A few hours of this,
        especially if you set up caroms that are typical 1pocket opening game
        situations, will greatly enhance your safety play.

        Put an object ball at various spots between one diamond and two diamonds
        from your opponent's pocket, an inch or less off the side rail. Put the
        rack where the balls would be racked and take cue ball in hand behind the
        line. From various angles, try and stop the cue ball *absolutely dead* while
        sending the object ball two rails into the rack (presumably, pushing balls
        there to your side). Then practice this while bridging off the head rail.
        This will help when your opponent sends you up table.

        Put an object ball on the spot. Shooting off the side rail (cue ball not
        frozen, perhaps a few inches off) just a little lower than the spot, try and
        stop the cue ball so that it comes to rest absolutely dead on the spot. The
        ability to kill the cue ball -- with a high degree of precision in this
        area -- will get you out of many jams.

        Throw the one, two, and three ball out around the bottom of the table and,
        starting with ball in hand behind the line, shoot them into your pocket in
        rotation. (Obviously, you need to give yourself a starting shot on the one
        ball.) Depending on your skill level, you can increase the number of balls
        and how far up table you spread them. You'll learn position plays you
        certainly wouldn't ever select to shoot of your own free will and volition,
        but that the table (opponent) might force you to play during a game.

        Lastly, throw just a few balls out between the foot rail and spot. Shooting
        off the head rail, make the cue ball travel absolutely straight through the
        object ball and die on the foot rail. Do this on shots that will have the
        cue ball traveling straight to the foot rail as well as shots that have it
        going off a side rail to the foot rail. It's important to pay attention and
        make sure your cue ball is tracking straight through the object ball,
        because in a game situation, you'll often be "threading the needle" past
        other balls or trying to avoid a scratch. This is will help you greatly in
        end game situations.

        Obviously there are many, many more you could practice, but these are the
        ones, off the top of my head, that I thought would be worth working on.

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        • #5
          Howdy t-dog. I'm a certainly not in the league of Keith so my advice is just what I have found helps me. (Incidently, I'm gonna steal a bit of what Keith gave you ).

          When I first went to Grady he emphasied the importance of being able to 'thin' a ball. Feather, brush, whatever you want to call it - just barely touching a ball as you pass it. I set up a ball and from various distances see if I can thin it so that it moves only 1/4 to 1/2 inch. I keep trying even though my eyes keep me from seeing the ball edge real sharp.

          I also practice one rail kicks to make a ball that is on or close to the rail and about a diamond from the pocket. It can come in real handy.

          Later, Pel
          ..........
          I shoot pool like I make love - I'm not very good but do have a lot of fun trying.

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