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  • Champions collide

    this from black-balled at azb
    For those of you whowho missed this:

    Blomdahl- powerful, precise...and a very good pool player, as well as one of the top 3c players of the past decade. Holder of 15 World titles in 3c.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torbj%C3%B6rn_Blomdahl

    Reyes- do I really need to say more? See him compete as underdog, for once (3x, actually).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efren_Reyes

    Cuelemans- won first World title in 1961 and is the only player to remain at the top-level for 40 years. Unheard-of, especially given the changes 3c has seen in his time, IMO. The definition of an Icon.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Ceulemans

  • #2
    [ATTACH]6544[/ATTACH]

    [ATTACH]6545[/ATTACH]

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    • #3
      Efren playing balkline should be fascinating.

      I know Blomdahl played well against Reyes years ago at nine ball, but he himself has said he has no chance overall against the Pinoys at regular pool.

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      • #4
        I know what Balkline Billiards is and many of the variations I have heard of but I've never seen 71.2. I had to google it and find it on wickipedia.

        Originally posted by wickipedia
        In the balkline games, rather than drawing balklines a few inches from the corners, the entire table is divided into rectangular balk spaces, by drawing balklines a certain distance lengthwise and widthwise across the length of the table a set distance parallel out from each rail. This divides the table into eight rectangular balk spaces.

        For the most part, the differences between one balkline game to another is defined by two measures: 1) the spacing of the balklines, and 2) the number of points that are allowed in each balk space before at least one ball must leave the region. Generally, balkline games, and their particular restrictions, are given numerical names indicating both of these characteristics; the first number indicated either inches or centimeters depending on the game, and the second, after a dot, indicates the count restriction in balk spaces, which is always either one or two. For example, in 18.2 balkline, one of the more prominent balkline games and of U.S. origin, the name indicates that balklines are drawn 18 inches distant from each rail, and only two counts are allowed in a balk space before a ball must leave. By contrast, in 71.2 balkline, of French invention, lines are drawn 71 centimeters distant from each rail, also with a two count restriction for balk spaces.
        Those damn French! Here's an example of a layout of balklines and what I think they call anchor points or something.

        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          fyi dont know how this makes it more or less difficult
          heres a post that maybe mr. 3 cushion could answer this question
          Click image for larger version

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          • #6
            You have got to be kidding !........

            Larry and Cowslut Dennis,...I would not rely on anyone who has major problems counting three rails, (as his name implies) let alone try and explain to us the intricacies of a French game involving centimeters...
            Last edited by SJDinPHX; 07-22-2012, 03:23 AM.

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