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  • #46
    Originally posted by jerry matchin View Post
    Jerry Matchin AKA Baby Huey. Played in LA all my life and hustled pool from 66 to 73 and went to Nursing School and became an RN. Worked and retired from LA County USC Medical Center. Started playing again in 83 and now I own a room in Ventura Ca. I have and will play anybody one pocket if the game is right and I don't mean 8 to 4 and the breaks. You can come to California and call me up and I am an easy match up. I like to think I play pretty fair for an old fat guy. You can get action with me. If you beat me I will take you to dinner. I have played Efie, Cliff and John Schmidt in my room and never went to less than 7 balls. I love one pocket and I think it's the best pool game baring none.

    over and out
    I dont even know you. Ive heard of you from Rich and Wayne. But I like you already.

    Comment


    • #47
      I want to say that it is really nice to read these short bios of you guys. Keep them coming.

      Comment


      • #48
        Mike Filholm 52. Brookings S.Dak.
        Lived in the dfw area of Tx for 25 years.Was introduced
        to this great 1 hole thing there.Saw our Billy Tommy Ray
        Joey Barnes Sylver Wade Crane Lizard Salazar and more
        match up over the years.
        I had some early sucess playing 8&9 ball while in college.
        Went to ACUI nationals. Didnt win but enjoyed seeing good
        Talent.
        I am fortunate to be able to play in a private room here with
        Great equipment 2 Diamonds proshimmed in great condition.
        Play Danny Olson, a great young player who is capable of
        beating anyone.
        Havent been to DCC before but plan on making the trip this
        next year and hope to meet some of you there!
        Anyone traveling thru this area give a shout and we can match
        up.

        Comment


        • #49
          Tom Harris, 67 years old
          Born in Dawson Springs Ky
          Started college Western Kentucky in Bowling Green Ky
          Married for 37 years to my beautiful wife Judie and have 2 kids, 3 grandkids
          Vietnam veteran, Navy
          Have lived all over the USA and Mexico
          Lived in Orlando for the last 5 years since retiring
          from the auto industry in Detroit.
          Went to Johnson City in 1966
          Played some at the Rack in Oak Park , mostly with California John and Woofie
          Love to play one pocket, not very good at it, maybe a B- player
          Been to the Derby almost every year, going this year.
          Better banker then one pocket player
          Also like to play poker.
          Last edited by poolandpokerman; 10-23-2014, 10:10 AM.

          Comment


          • #50
            WHO am i?

            Jim fulcher, 70 years old, began playing pool in 1956 in Dawson Springs, Ky.
            Returned from Vietnam, and settled in Louisville, Ky. area in 1969. Retired in 2004, have played in all the DCC's in the bank pool division, highest finish was top 17. Still compete in local Tournaments, and play in an apa pool league just to stay in touch with pool. I'm more of a bank pool player than anything else. I practice daily, play with Jacoby cues, still love the game, and intend to play until i'm not able to.
            Jim
            Last edited by Big Jim; 10-24-2014, 04:43 PM.

            Comment


            • #51
              Short story made long

              You asked for it:

              Cary Gollnick, 66 & counting, raised in Houston. My first ambition, starting at four, was to be a knife thrower at the circus. By the time I could split broom handles at thirty feet (about age 10) I realized there was no real future in it so moved on to my second ambition: to be a trainer of Arabian horses (I would have been a jockey but 6'-1" jockeys seldom get a ride). I stuck with that, and was lucky enough to alternate working with a couple of legendary Arabian trainers), until I discovered girls and got my driver's license at 14-1/2. Started learning pool at a room out in the Spring Branch area on a 5x10 table. By the time I was 16 I was playing for small stakes on the bar boxes in local beer joints & don't recall ever losing. I never played or knew Alfie but I recognized him when I saw his photo in his book and am certain that I saw him around. Occasionally visited LeCue & watched many of the legends that came through.

              The late spring of 1966 I graduated high school (barely) and shortly thereafter my girl friend of 3 yrs. dumped me. A friend was heading back to his hometown (Key West) and invited me along. On the way the car we were in caught fire and burned, still a couple hundred miles short. We sold his girl friends poodle to a cab driver for bus fare the rest of the way. When we got to Key West, I took our last $5 to Perra's Pool Hall on the main drag & promptly lost it to a twelve year old playing 8-ball . Spent the balance of the summer really learning to play & was running 100 by the middle of August. There was a guy there who came in every morning, broke a 14.1 rack and ran 300 straight before he quit for the day. I never saw him miss, although the locals said he occasionally did and would just start over. Since he was the only full time player I knew (he had five kids, a wife, a house, a car, a really nice fishing boat and no job). I naturally thought that to be a successful player you needed to be able to play at his level. So much for being a hustler (I still think he did me a favor).

              At the end of August, I found myself in the Key West city jail for a bunch of stuff I didn't do (really) and when they let me out I hitch hiked to Miami and joined the Army. Ten months later I was the youngest commissioned officer in the Army (19 & one month). Got married to the same girl who had dumped the summer before in December of '66 (we will have been married 48 years this December). Went to Vietnam, got shot all over my body (really) and decided I had no interest in being a career target.

              Went to college briefly but got into construction (as an apprentice plumber) when my first son was born. By then I was too busy raising a family to play pool. Reagan's recession put me in business for myself in 1980, which lasted for ten years. In the mid-eighties my oldest son (we had two by then) was given a table (a cheap 8 footer) and I started playing again. By 1990 I was playing pretty good but not like before. In '91 I sold out my business and got a real job, with a regular paycheck, as a mechanical quality control inspector (later QC Manager) for one of the largest general contractors in the country. Didn't pick up a cue again until 2004 (I'm still trying to play, hoping I can learn how again). By now I've retired twice, once from the general contractor, then from the Corps of Engineers (they had talked me out of retirement to help with a $750m hospital since I'd QC'ed several others). After I retired from the Corp, they again persuaded me to come back part-time, three days a week for the same $, as a civilian "contractor". I'll retire again in three weeks and I'm changing my phone number.

              PS: I have five Arabian mares, three of which I bred (including the one in my avatar), all of which I broke and trained myself. Only broke three ribs doing it. The ground has gotten a lot harder over the years.
              Last edited by Cary; 10-24-2014, 07:50 AM.
              "If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague."---unknown

              Comment


              • #52
                Your true identity

                Damn Cary. Sounds like you could write a great book. Thank you for your military service.
                Mitch needs to remember to play the score and that it's better to win than to look like a hero.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Damn Cary, I'm envious of your history. I wish mine was like yours, all except of the being shot up part.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Great post, Cary. Hope you're still going to be able to see Jerry Miculek Saturday... If you are, hope you write a report on it...
                    "Born Into This"

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Jimmy B View Post
                      Great post, Cary. Hope you're still going to be able to see Jerry Miculek Saturday... If you are, hope you write a report on it...
                      You couldn't keep me away. It's an annual event put on by these folks:

                      http://www.honoredveterans.org/

                      R. Lee Ermey, aka "Gunny", (who is actually a helluva nice guy) has attended every year and is scheduled to be there also. Jerry was scheduled to be there last year but was unable to make it. He arranged for Rob Leatham, who has won more practical pistol shooting championships than anyone in history, and two other world champion shooters, to fill in for him.
                      "If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague."---unknown

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Hey there,

                        45 years old.

                        Born and raised in the Chicago area.

                        I began playing pool at about 12 years old when my parents bought us kids a Sears plywood bed pool table. My brother and I would bang 'em around in the basement 'til my parents stomped their feet on the kitchen floor above.

                        Mis-spent young adult college opportunity when shooting pool in the NIU Husky den seemed to conflict with daily studies.

                        After "college" I rolled into the 12 hrs a day everyday pool thing for about 2 years.

                        Had my daughter at 21 years old...now she is grown and maried and I am the proud grandfather to my 4 year old granddaughter and 1 year grandson.

                        Police officer just outside Chicago...going into me 20th year.

                        Have played one pocket since the late 80's when I was first introduced to the game by an older local..."Johnny the Suit". At the time I was a young 9-ball player.

                        Nick names have included "Dr.Draw" and "Sarge"...none really ever stuck though.

                        I love the game, have given lessons, and played in as many tournments as possible...best finish was in Deby banks a few years ago when I lost to Shannon Daulton to place something like 18th-24th.

                        I'm willing to try out just about anybody who is around...for a little or alot

                        Currently play about once a week in a straight pool league out of Red Shoes...high run is 80.

                        I don't hustle, although some days it might look like I am trying to...lol.

                        Hobbies include..photography, backpacking,woodworking,bike riding-bicycle/motorcycle.

                        I've got plenty to keep me busy and will probably look to photography once the police career is retired.

                        Hoping to meet anyone around at the Derby this year,

                        -Mike Eck
                        Live long and play strong,
                        -Chicagomike

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Cary View Post
                          You couldn't keep me away. It's an annual event put on by these folks:

                          http://www.honoredveterans.org/

                          R. Lee Ermey, aka "Gunny", (who is actually a helluva nice guy) has attended every year and is scheduled to be there also. Jerry was scheduled to be there last year but was unable to make it. He arranged for Rob Leatham, who has won more practical pistol shooting championships than anyone in history, and two other world champion shooters, to fill in for him.

                          That's great, Cary. Big fan of Ermey here. Lot's of videos of him on you tube also. By the way, the circus talk brought back memories. I worked a bit in the circus. Here is an early photo. I didn't do anything. People just paid to come and look at me. A lot of us called it 'Circus So Lame'







                          Later on, I got ambitious and wanted to really get with it. I became a human dart board. They would throw at the balloon tattoo on my back there. The greatest show on earth.





                          But seriously, I just wanted to bump up this good thread. I noticed Boston Blacky just joined, and perhaps he (and other) will want to introduce themselves. Now back to the calliope and clown alley...
                          "Born Into This"

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            John Mustarde
                            from Fort Worth, TX
                            Currently living in Reno, a small town outside of Paris TX

                            First played at Frank's just off 7th Street across from the huge Montgomery Wards store and warehouse. It was about 1967; 8 ball was 15 cents, 9 ball a dime. "Rack, Frank!" brought the rack man to your table to collect the coins and rack the balls. Kids had to say it with some respect, or Frank Junior would shoot us a nasty look, and then rack around the tables twice before returning to us.

                            Through the seventies I hung out at the Golden Nugget in Ft Worth, a few miles west of downtown Ft Worth, next door to the Seventh Street Theatre, one of the last movie houses in town. U.J Puckett showed up often; J. R. Richardson was known as Magnolia Red and had a pink Johnsons Baby Shampoo bottle full of gin or vodka, which he would squirt straight down his throat and holler "Nik Nik Nik Bllubbllubbllub at the top of his lungs then start singing off key - a hard act to follow. He and some others always played $50 or under one pocket. I learned to love the game.

                            I wasted time and talent trying to make a living as a printer as my father had done, but times had changed. He raised four kids in moderate comfort; I starved and lived paycheck to paycheck. Being a dirt poor working stiff cost me many hard years and two marriages. I eventually returned to school age 37 and eventually graduated at age 42 Magna Cum Laude from a college in the University of Texas system. I took college classes off and on for over 21 years before earning a bachelors, some sort of record I suppose.

                            I used my degree to become a mental health/mental retardation case manager, but that lasted less than two years. I went to another school to learn insurance adjusting, and while there applied for a managerial job with a major corporation and got hired. That was the best break of my working life, and it lead to marrying a wonderful woman with whom I am still very much in love. We earned a good living and I enjoyed several lucrative promotions. But about 2006, managing a plant in Gilbert AZ, I was suddenly 'down-sized' and out of work at age 55 1/2. I found it impossible to find a decent paying job as an unemployed white male age 55 1/2. I was always overqualified, or they knew that ten bucks an hour would not float my boat for long.

                            Back problems which had existed for many years led to several failed surgeries, and some years after I received full disability through Social Security, which is where I stand, or rather sit, now.

                            My wonderful wife and I returned to Texas, moving into a small house with a big shop in a little county of only 30,000 population. It's great here except for one thing - no pool hall closer than 60 miles away, except for the 8-foot table in my shop. The years of surgeries and being out of work are over now. We get by thanks to SS and some savings.

                            I lurk and seldom post here and very rarely on AZB. My hobby was photography but that ended when I could no longer carry the gear around. I love the pool stories from any era but I'm pretty partial to stories about those who played and roamed during the 70s.

                            I am excited about my pool game now for the first time in years. I bought the new Mark Wilson book 'Play Great Pool', and it is the book I wanted when I was 16 but did not know it. It's a great book for anyone wanting to learn pool, teach pool, or revamp their game, or evaluate their game.

                            My big weakness is that I can't seem to write a short post, as you can see.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Texdance View Post
                              John Mustarde
                              from Fort Worth, TX

                              My big weakness is that I can't seem to write a short post, as you can see.
                              Damn. I wish it was longer.

                              Very good.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Texdance View Post
                                John Mustarde
                                from Fort Worth, TX
                                Currently living in Reno, a small town outside of Paris TX


                                Through the seventies I hung out at the Golden Nugget in Ft Worth, a few miles west of downtown Ft Worth, next door to the Seventh Street Theatre, one of the last movie houses in town. U.J Puckett showed up often; J. R. Richardson was known as Magnolia Red and had a pink Johnsons Baby Shampoo bottle full of gin or vodka, which he would squirt straight down his throat and holler "Nik Nik Nik Bllubbllubbllub at the top of his lungs then start singing off key - a hard act to follow. He and some others always played $50 or under one pocket. I learned to love the game.
                                I remember Magnolia Red from the Texas Rec. He played quite well then.
                                There was another guy around they called "Blue Eyes" maybe Dutch, who enjoyed gambling a bit. He was a bookmaker.

                                One more I remember was "Jerry the burglar" A shoplifter.
                                He'd send you down the street to a clothier with a little colored pin. He said put it under the lapel of a suit, Hickey Freeman, Louie Roth, whatever. when you got back he be gone less that an hour and be back with your order.

                                Puckett introduced him to me at the club with telephones on every table.
                                When he'd get out a cigarette one of the waitresses would slide up to lite it for him.
                                I said "you've got some pull around here" He said every one they lite costs me a pair of capri pants.

                                Puckett was a trip himself.
                                Rod.
                                Rod.

                                Rodney Stephens.
                                (e-mail) rod.stephens0105@att.net(e-mail) #713-973-0503 is now working

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