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Old 12-10-2017, 09:47 AM
vapros vapros is offline
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Default Shooters and others

After about twenty-five years of fighting this disability, I am quite certain that being a good shooter - a good ball potter - is a natural talent not available to those who don't have it. My own improvement has been negligible, and I don't think old age has much to do with it. I can still see.

All comments are welcome, and I would especially like to hear from the instructors who post or lurk here. Thanks -
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Old 12-10-2017, 09:52 AM
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cincy_kid cincy_kid is offline
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Even when I was in my 20's playing every day (9 ball and one hole mostly), I was never a great ball potter. I mean, I could run a rack or 2 at 9 ball and sure I have had an 8 and out or few...but to see the way Dennis O, SVB, Alex, Jayson Shaw and others make balls so flawlessly, I have to agree with you ...

It's been 20+ years for me since I have been able to play consistently so I would love the chance to try it again and see how well I can do, but my guess is, as my eyes aren't getting any better - I will have to rely more on knowledge / moves....
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Old 12-10-2017, 10:02 AM
LSJohn LSJohn is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vapros View Post
After about twenty-five years of fighting this disability, I am quite certain that being a good shooter - a good ball potter - is a natural talent not available to those who don't have it. My own improvement has been negligible, and I don't think old age has much to do with it. I can still see.

All comments are welcome, and I would especially like to hear from the instructors who post or lurk here. Thanks -
I think it is like many other things in sports -- hitting a baseball, putting, shooting 3-pointers -- with good instruction and dedicated, disciplined practice considerable improvement is possible, but it will never get you to the level where we see some 16-year-old kids: My friend Pat, Shannon, Earl, Alex, Billy Thorpe, Hunter White and many, many others ... could shoot your eye out at 100 yards before they were 18.
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Old 12-10-2017, 10:26 AM
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wgcp wgcp is offline
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If you want to make balls you have to love the game.

The beard told me you might have to hit a million balls to learn. He had his systems. They can take you closer to where you want to be but not all the way.

John Brumback told me to practice with a purpose. Set goals and move them harder as you achieve them. Which will certainly improve some of your shots.
But it wonít get you all the way there.

Since I retired three years ago I started a journey to see if I could become competitive at this game. I relate my journey to a deck of cards. I got through half the deck rather rapidly. Now I might get a card every two or three months.it can be frustrating.

I do have to say though you have to play against anyone to continue to improve. You also have to play a lot of pool. Which I do,playing every day.

Doc says I hit straight backs before most of you have a cup of coffee in the morning and he is correct. I try and make 10 in a row before I quit that shot.

But most important isnít the making of the balls, it is learning how to win. I donít care if it is 9 ball, 8 ball, banks, or one pocket. You have to learn how to win.

Just my two cents. Me and my dead money will go to derby again this year, where I can go two and out against the best in the world.

But I ainít gonna quit anytime soon either.

B
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Old 12-10-2017, 10:36 AM
beatle beatle is offline
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those with the best hand and eye co ordination will make the most shots.

but there are only two way to miss a shot. one is to not aim for the correct spot
on the object ball. that can easily be corrected but most dont give it the time needed.

the 2nd way is to not hit where you are aiming if correctly on the cueball and/or having your stroke not hit that spot. easily fixed by getting your stroke straight by practice.

only then can you play to the best of your natural ability.

it is easier though to learn to make better games.
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Old 12-10-2017, 11:13 AM
Dennis "Whitey" Young Dennis "Whitey" Young is offline
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Vapros, we need more info from you to help from a far for there are so many factors involved in pocketing balls. For instance; how are you addressing the shot, do you stay down on the shot, how true is your stroke, how strong is your focus, what's going through your head prior to missing a shot, do you have a problem with anxiety, how many strokes do you take before you fire, are you over thinking the shot, do you consistently stroke the same, have you tried various shot making systems, are you having a hard time knowing where to hit the ball, does playing position create problems, are you confused as to why you missed the shot, and do you consistently miss the same shot the same way, do you always use english on shots, or can you make balls with no english, why do you think you miss the shot?

All of the above can be improved upon, but first you have to realize that you need improvement in a certain discipline, and many players do not realize this. A good instructor should be able to pick up on any dysfunctional pocketing disciplines, and thus raise your game up substantially. But you will have to work on it, and may need to take refresher instructions to stay on track. Whitey
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Old 12-10-2017, 11:20 AM
Hardmix Hardmix is offline
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In my opinion, the two main reasons balls are missed are not striking the intended target on the CB and coming out of the shot (prairie dogging).
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Old 12-10-2017, 12:14 PM
boingo boingo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vapros View Post
After about twenty-five years of fighting this disability, I am quite certain that being a good shooter - a good ball potter - is a natural talent not available to those who don't have it. My own improvement has been negligible, and I don't think old age has much to do with it. I can still see.

All comments are welcome, and I would especially like to hear from the instructors who post or lurk here. Thanks -
I know that this will sound arrogant, I don't intend it to and I apologize if it comes off that way but I agree that there is some level of natural talent that establishes one's potential. Of course that potential must be realized through training, practice, and learning from others but I feel that the limit is set by an inherent talent.
An example that comes to mind is Luther Lassiter and billiard shots, particularly billiard shots where the second object ball is one or more diamonds from the pocket and the cue ball curvature off the first object ball is significant. From what I have read he was known for making these shots quite predictably and I believe it after watching an old film clip of him making one.
Another example is Efren Reyes. His nickname "Magician" explains it all. He routinely made shots that most of us would never consider even remotely predictable.
From what I have read Jimmy Reid was that way with combination shots and I have watched Keith McCready make combinations that others would not risk attempting.
How about great one handed shooters? I watch and I wonder how some of those shots are even possible yet they do it again and again.
With all that said I will add that I have been surprised at how significant muscle memory is and how much one can improve over a long period of time but again I feel that our individual limits are set by inherent talent.
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Old 12-10-2017, 01:23 PM
beatle beatle is offline
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once the cue tip strikes the cue ball it doesnt matter anymore whether you jump wiggle or cry, the shot is over as far as the balls are concerned.
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Old 12-10-2017, 02:10 PM
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jrhendy jrhendy is offline
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I think talent increases your desire which increases the time spent, which makes you a better player.

There are lots of players that love the game that will never be real good players. They may enjoy playing more than the good players that may even have a love/hate relationship with the game.

I canít/wonít play unless there is some competition involved (Tournament or gambling), but that is just me.
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