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  #1  
Old 08-06-2007, 06:26 PM
Samiel Samiel is offline
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Default Uptable Balls

My greatest weakness (except for being able to run balls) are One Pocket games that involve multiple balls uptable. Can anyone give me a general strategy on how to deal with situations where there are no bankable balls uptable?

Do you try to leave your opponent uptable?
Do you try to leave your opponent downtable with no bankable balls?

I find myself trying to break up clusters in the attempt to leave myself bankable balls. Most times my opponent will just tie up those balls again or leave me nothing to bank.

How do pros deal with this type of game?

Last edited by Samiel; 08-06-2007 at 06:29 PM.
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  #2  
Old 08-07-2007, 12:50 AM
desert1pocket desert1pocket is offline
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I'm no expert or great player, but here's my take on uptable balls. When you are significantly ahead, try to leave the balls uptable out of play, and don't worry about breaking up the clusters. If you only need one or two, and your opponent needs several, there's no need to put more than one ball into play at a time.

If you are behind however, try to get some balls back downtable if it can be done safely. Try to get as many balls in play as possible, so that if your opponent makes a mistake, you may gat a chance to run several balls rather than just one. Making a ball in the top corner pocket on your opponents side and spotting it up is a common way to do this.

In general you should only be looking to break out balls from clusters if you can be sure that it won't sell out any free shots. I love to make clusters against aggressive players, because they so often give me a free 2 or 3 rail bank trying to break up the cluster. Just be patient, and wait for good opportunities.

As far as leaving the ball uptable or downtable, I usually just play whatever is the safest shot. Look for easy ways to trap your opponent behind a cluster to try and force an error, and look out for easy opportunities for them to do the same to you.

Hope that helps some.
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  #3  
Old 08-07-2007, 08:29 AM
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NH Steve NH Steve is offline
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Like desert1 said, it depends on the score. If you are ahead significantly, that's good for you if the balls are out of play. If you are behind, then most pros would be looking to safely push the balls back down.

When the balls are clustered up there, look for an opportunity to either pocket a ball in a nuetral pocket, or knock one back down, but at the same time leave your opponent hooked on the ball that goes back down. These opportunities come up a lot because the balls are clustered near each other.

What ever you do, avoid scratching! Scratches will kill you whether you are ahead or behind -- they can easily swing the game. It is very common to be lulled to sleep because of the slow pace of opportunistic shots, but whatevery you do, don't scratch -- maybe that will give you something to focus on!
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:39 PM
roo7227 roo7227 is offline
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Default Theories Abound..

You guys are somewhat correct (IMO) about strategies, depending upon the score.. However, IMO, it's a bit more complicated than that..

For instance, there have been many times that I have (along with my opponent) moved balls uptable, even though I was behind.. There are a number of reasons why I would do this..

1. It prolongs the game..

2. Many people, in fact I would say most people, are unaware of how to play the game properly, once the balls get uptable..

3. My opponents skill level is less than mine..

4. It limits the running of balls..


Reason #2 is a very important issue.. There are many "so-called" champions who struggle with this particular problem, for different reasons.. Mostly because, IMO, the game is played at a higher offensive level, and the "wedge" game has, to some extent, gone the way of the Dodo..
There's a reason players like Efren, and Cliff (to some extent), and Gabe, and Jeremy are the best onepocket players in the world.. They understand ball positioning better than other champions.. And consequently, they are capable of employing many different strategies in an attempt to beat they're opponent..

My advice to you is to try and understand what situations your opponent DOESN'T like to be in, and exploit that position.. That's how you win at onepocket..
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  #5  
Old 11-28-2014, 11:14 AM
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unoperro unoperro is offline
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Bringing back a good post that didnt get much response.
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  #6  
Old 11-28-2014, 01:21 PM
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Patrick Johnson Patrick Johnson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unoperro View Post
Bringing back a good post that didnt get much response.
I'd appreciate more conversation about this. It's one of the areas I struggle with the most - probably because I usually lose before many balls get uptable.

pj
chgo
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  #7  
Old 11-28-2014, 06:27 PM
bstroud bstroud is offline
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The key to the up table game is distance.

Leave your opponent as long as possible and frozen to the end rail.

From there even the best players have difficulty hitting the cue ball precisely and will leave you a shot.

Bill S.
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  #8  
Old 11-28-2014, 07:20 PM
beatle beatle is offline
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up table is similar to chess. the smarter person and the one that can develop opportunities is the favorite. not the better shooter unless he is way better.

but learn long rail banks and speed control. nothing is gained if you cant miss a shot and leave it close by or where you want it to be.
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  #9  
Old 11-28-2014, 09:29 PM
lll lll is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beatle View Post
up table is similar to chess. the smarter person and the one that can develop opportunities is the favorite. not the better shooter unless he is way better.

but learn long rail banks and speed control. nothing is gained if you cant miss a shot and leave it close by or where you want it to be.
someone told me
keep the cue ball above( towards the foot rail) the object ball
what do you think???
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  #10  
Old 11-28-2014, 09:53 PM
vapros vapros is offline
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Larry, I think that is common knowledge, except that 'up table' is toward the head of the table. The foot rail is below. Similar to your head and your feet. Sort of.
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