Go Back   OnePocket.org Forums > One Pocket Forum
Register FAQ Members List Social Groups Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-22-2014, 12:00 PM
petie petie is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Citrus Springs, FL
Posts: 3,314
Default Is there something to this? Or not.

I am always trying to get new players into the game of One Pocket. The other day I was selling the game to a guy who had never played it and a guy from across the room who used to play (according to him) but who now plays strictly 9-Ball says, "He doesn't want to learn One Pocket because it will ruin his stroke for other games like 9-Ball." Does anybody here think that is true? What, if any, truth is there to it? Personally, I think some One Pocket shots do expand the inventory of stroke techniques of a 9-Ball player but this can be considered an enhancement rather than a detriment. To me, if you want to make a ball in a given pocket and make the cue ball follow an intended path to an intended destination, you pretty much use the same stroke no matter what game you are playing. I'd really like to hear what others think about this.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-22-2014, 12:19 PM
bstroud bstroud is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,415
Default

Petie,

I personally think that different games are a factor on how your stroke works.

Great one pocket players are usually not the best 9 ball players.

Straight pool players generally are not great 9 ball players. Hollman excepted.

Most 9 ball players depend on a combination of shot making and position.

Most straight players depend on position and finesse.

Only the greatest players seem to play all games well.

Bill S.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-22-2014, 12:35 PM
jerry matchin jerry matchin is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,280
Default

This is a great post. One Pocket requires moving the Q Ball into different locations within a small playing area. Different strokes are often required for each shot. All that bunting and eventually you come up with a shot and guess what, you miss. How does that happen? Well, you lost your shooting stroke and found your bunting stroke. It has happened to every serious one pocket player and it's painful. Great ball strikers seem to manage to get their offense into gear a little easier then the rest of us. But even they manage to pull a rabbit of the hat and miss a hanger. What is interesting though is that very good bankers don't lose their bank stroke and make their banks playing one pocket at a very high percentage. How about a situation where you play hard and get ball in hand behind the line and whoops you miss with ball in hand. Again it's that bunt stroke and you just can't find your offense until you have run a few balls and all of a sudden you can make anything.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-22-2014, 12:38 PM
mr3cushion's Avatar
mr3cushion mr3cushion is offline
Suspended
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cocoa Beach, FL
Posts: 6,062
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bstroud View Post
Petie,

I personally think that different games are a factor on how your stroke works.

Great one pocket players are usually not the best 9 ball players.

Straight pool players generally are not great 9 ball players. Hollman excepted.

Most 9 ball players depend on a combination of shot making and position.

Most straight players depend on position and finesse.

Only the greatest players seem to play all games well.

Bill S.
Excellent description Bill of GREAT players!

I think the GREAT 'straight pool' players back in the day, Mosconi, Crane, Caras... would have been some of the TOP 1P players if they played it back then! The straight pool players knowledge about the 'stack' alone is a BIG plus, as in Danny D's game. Their position running balls in the 'rack' end of the table is their cup-of-tea and the safety play will come with just playing and observing other TOP 1P players. JMHO!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-22-2014, 01:28 PM
petie petie is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Citrus Springs, FL
Posts: 3,314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bstroud View Post
Petie,

I personally think that different games are a factor on how your stroke works.

Great one pocket players are usually not the best 9 ball players.

Straight pool players generally are not great 9 ball players. Hollman excepted.

Most 9 ball players depend on a combination of shot making and position.

Most straight players depend on position and finesse.

Only the greatest players seem to play all games well.

Bill S.
I admit to not being the best 9-Ball player but I'm considering delving back into it just to try to prove a point. I have played fairly sporty 9-Ball but that was 35 years ago. The problem is I only have about 3 hours of playing time per session before I should get off my feet. Do I want to play 9-Ball or One Pocket? Its hard to love 9-Ball when you've played One Pocket for awhile.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-22-2014, 01:32 PM
petie petie is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Citrus Springs, FL
Posts: 3,314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry matchin View Post
This is a great post. One Pocket requires moving the Q Ball into different locations within a small playing area. Different strokes are often required for each shot. All that bunting and eventually you come up with a shot and guess what, you miss. How does that happen? Well, you lost your shooting stroke and found your bunting stroke. It has happened to every serious one pocket player and it's painful. Great ball strikers seem to manage to get their offense into gear a little easier then the rest of us. But even they manage to pull a rabbit of the hat and miss a hanger. What is interesting though is that very good bankers don't lose their bank stroke and make their banks playing one pocket at a very high percentage. How about a situation where you play hard and get ball in hand behind the line and whoops you miss with ball in hand. Again it's that bunt stroke and you just can't find your offense until you have run a few balls and all of a sudden you can make anything.
Up until a couple of months ago, I played a guy regularly at Capone's in Spring Hill, FL who has now finally quit playing pool at age 87. He could really move and never, ever missed a cross corner bank shot. The only way you could get him to dog the ball was to leave him a straight in. He was hard to beat. He called himself Boston Blackie or just Blackie.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-22-2014, 01:36 PM
petie petie is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Citrus Springs, FL
Posts: 3,314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr3cushion View Post
Excellent description Bill of GREAT players!

I think the GREAT 'straight pool' players back in the day, Mosconi, Crane, Caras... would have been some of the TOP 1P players if they played it back then! The straight pool players knowledge about the 'stack' alone is a BIG plus, as in Danny D's game. Their position running balls in the 'rack' end of the table is their cup-of-tea and the safety play will come with just playing and observing other TOP 1P players. JMHO!
I don't know if its true but there is a story about Fatty cornering Willie Mosconi and finally getting him to play some One Pocket. The story is about Fattie talking to his backer on the phone. He says, "I hit the jackpot. I've got Willie playing me even up One Pocket and he doesn't have a chance to beat me because he has no idea how to play. The only thing he knows how to do is run balls. Wire me some more money."

Last edited by petie; 10-22-2014 at 01:42 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-22-2014, 01:38 PM
mr3cushion's Avatar
mr3cushion mr3cushion is offline
Suspended
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cocoa Beach, FL
Posts: 6,062
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry matchin View Post
This is a great post. One Pocket requires moving the Q Ball into different locations within a small playing area. Different strokes are often required for each shot. All that bunting and eventually you come up with a shot and guess what, you miss. How does that happen? Well, you lost your shooting stroke and found your bunting stroke. It has happened to every serious one pocket player and it's painful. Great ball strikers seem to manage to get their offense into gear a little easier then the rest of us. But even they manage to pull a rabbit of the hat and miss a hanger. What is interesting though is that very good bankers don't lose their bank stroke and make their banks playing one pocket at a very high percentage. How about a situation where you play hard and get ball in hand behind the line and whoops you miss with ball in hand. Again it's that bunt stroke and you just can't find your offense until you have run a few balls and all of a sudden you can make anything.
Another excellent post, and right on the money, IMHO! It seems so called 'shooters' who find themselves in that, bunt, bunt then have to come with it shot, try to do too much with the CB. Then they get in trouble trying to end the game on a aspect of their game they haven't used in 10-15 minutes in the 'moving' game. That's just another thing I noticed about Artie being in that same situation. He would look for the MOST advantages, but, simple shot to play first that would get him a chance to run the balls that were easily available and if the run-out is there proceed. If not, chip those few off and go back to defense. this in it's self is not a earth shattering method, it just takes the 'discipline' to 'continually' do it, time and time again!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-22-2014, 01:39 PM
petie petie is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Citrus Springs, FL
Posts: 3,314
Default

Seriously folks, aren't you supposed to get your yips out in the first rack or so? Why can't you make the transition from One Pocket to 9-Ball in the same day? I would say, for the sake of argument, that its the mind set as much as anything. Yep, mind set and attitude. What do you think?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-22-2014, 02:03 PM
LSJohn LSJohn is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: monett missouri
Posts: 7,581
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry matchin View Post
you just can't find your offense until you have run a few balls and all of a sudden you can make anything.
True, it just takes time to loosen up. In my amateur opinion, it's almost entirely a temporary phenomenon. It wouldn't be a good idea to go directly from a two-hour 1P match to a $1000 nine-ball match, but for a 9-ball match the next day, knowledge gained playing 1P would be worth more than minimal harm --if any -- to stroke.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All original content Copyright Onepocket.org and/or the original author. All rights reserved.