Go Back   OnePocket.org Forums > One Pocket Forum
Register FAQ Members List Social Groups Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-19-2018, 10:56 PM
Ross Keith Thompson Ross Keith Thompson is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: madisonville, texas
Posts: 120
Default Raising your game

If you're a veteran player of pocket billiards and your game has kind of flat lined but you are a decent player of pocket billiards you might want to try something different.

Larry Liscotti was a fabulous player of all games, and why is that. Straight pool that's why! He was a solid 14-1 player and it kept his nine ball game solid and his one pocket game formidable.

If anyone on this site wants to raise their game and are willing to put the time into it, try practicing 14-1 every time you go to the pool room.

If you are physically able practice 3 hours a day by yourself!

Do not practice with anyone else, do it alone!

Place a break ball near the stack and bust the stack open plus pocket the ball.

If you run all 14 balls your capable of leaving one ball near the rack for a break ball, if you don't accomplish it do it again.

Every time you go to the pool room, do the same thing over and over again.

If your 14 and 1 game improves guess what, your nine ball game just got better and your one hole game has gotten better all because of a game no one wants to play!

Most players practice what is comfortable for them or just a game they like.

Always practice by yourself if your serious about raising your game and if you can stand practicing 14 and 1 for hours it will pay dividends eventually.

Try this for 8-10 weeks and if you are already a decent player or solid player your game will jump up a notch, racks of 9 ball will come more often, eight and outs will be more common place in your one hole game.

But you have to be disciplined enough to do it.

I was never wild about the game myself but I did practice 14 and 1 occasionally and I believe it helped all my games in doing so.

You learn to break balls out and learn what precision position really is, you develop touch with your cue ball and this influences all pocket billiard games!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-19-2018, 11:45 PM
Jeff sparks Jeff sparks is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,911
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross Keith Thompson View Post
If you're a veteran player of pocket billiards and your game has kind of flat lined but you are a decent player of pocket billiards you might want to try something different.

Larry Liscotti was a fabulous player of all games, and why is that. Straight pool that's why! He was a solid 14-1 player and it kept his nine ball game solid and his one pocket game formidable.

If anyone on this site wants to raise their game and are willing to put the time into it, try practicing 14-1 every time you go to the pool room.

If you are physically able practice 3 hours a day by yourself!

Do not practice with anyone else, do it alone!

Place a break ball near the stack and bust the stack open plus pocket the ball.

If you run all 14 balls your capable of leaving one ball near the rack for a break ball, if you don't accomplish it do it again.

Every time you go to the pool room, do the same thing over and over again.

If your 14 and 1 game improves guess what, your nine ball game just got better and your one hole game has gotten better all because of a game no one wants to play!

Most players practice what is comfortable for them or just a game they like.

Always practice by yourself if your serious about raising your game and if you can stand practicing 14 and 1 for hours it will pay dividends eventually.

Try this for 8-10 weeks and if you are already a decent player or solid player your game will jump up a notch, racks of 9 ball will come more often, eight and outs will be more common place in your one hole game.

But you have to be disciplined enough to do it.

I was never wild about the game myself but I did practice 14 and 1 occasionally and I believe it helped all my games in doing so.

You learn to break balls out and learn what precision position really is, you develop touch with your cue ball and this influences all pocket billiard games!
Excellent advice Keith... good post...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-20-2018, 05:26 AM
lll lll is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: vero beach fl
Posts: 14,439
Default

thanks for the advice keith
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-20-2018, 03:28 PM
Dennis "Whitey" Young Dennis "Whitey" Young is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Klamath Falls, Or.
Posts: 1,158
Default

I have to 2nd this advice! I'd add, strive to get position within an inch. Put this above running balls, for the runs will come. Greenleaf, they say he could get position within a nickle, and the Deacon that gave Keith all he could handle in Johnston City, ran 309 balls on a 5x10 when he was a young man, and you do not accomplish this by playing slopping shape.

Keith picking Larry Liscotti game is the perfect example of a straight pool player first, playing 9-ball. For he was not your A-typical 9-ball player, for you knew he could play shape for he continually got that perfect shape to effortlessly get from one ball to the next. IMO most 9-ball players in early 70's were incredible shot makers to say the least, and not exactly great position players. Larry had this thing about holding his chalk in his bridge hand while he stroked, can not forget that, what classical style!

Thanks Keith! Your thread brought back fond memories of Liscotti! Whitey

Last edited by Dennis "Whitey" Young; 02-24-2018 at 09:23 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-20-2018, 07:35 PM
salamander salamander is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 9
Default

I really advocate learning straight pool. I grew up playing straight pool before learning any of the other games. When I started to learn one pocket I would occasionally run 8 and out, but still lose to guys that could not run more than a few balls. Of course as I learned the moves of the game I won more often until eventually I was able to spot most of them.

Straight pool helps you to read the pack for break outs and conditions you for running multiple balls. You learn to see patterns immediately. Straight pool is still my favorite game followed closely by one pocket.

I try to see one pocket as I would imagine the very best in the world see it: strategic moving until your opponent makes a mistake, at which time you run out.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-23-2018, 06:24 AM
Wight Wight is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross Keith Thompson View Post
If you're a veteran player of pocket billiards and your game has kind of flat lined but you are a decent player of pocket billiards you might want to try something different.
This seems like a very structured approach and I like it. I might have to try this in Summer when I'll have a lot more free time on my hands. Cheers, Ross.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-23-2018, 02:02 PM
Dennis "Whitey" Young Dennis "Whitey" Young is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Klamath Falls, Or.
Posts: 1,158
Default

To booster straight pool practice some more, it develops certain shots in groves over other games. Shots as; combinations, throw shots, kiss shots, break out shots, and carom shots. Reading the rack, getting that exact position to break out some balls, learning all the different break outs, playing the throw shots and kiss shot are the elements of the game that I loved. Vern Peterson said you need to know where each ball is going when you break them out, as he is running 70 on me. And you'll learn this and it really helps, especially in one pocket.

Within my daily practice I always devoted 1 hour to straight pool even though it bored me. But, I am sure glad I did for no other game would of got me skilled in all these not so common shots.

I second what Salamander alluded to about positioning in one pocket. One of the biggest problems players have from pros on down is their inability to run out in one pocket when it is there! 8 is there and they get 2 or 3, and that is because they end up on the wrong side of a ball and it stops their run.

To get ready for a straight pool match I like throwing out 10 balls on the foot end of the table and pocket them in just one foot pocket, and if my shape is off I reshoot until I am within an inch, then go to the next shot. This helps for one pocket also. I do this with each pocket all around the table.

Another game for one pocket is to break the rack sending balls towards your hole and deliberately leaving your self a shot, and see how many balls you can run. When you miss or scratch it ends the rack, a scratch is a loss of a ball. Do this for 5 breaks and see how many balls you can run. When you get to where you run all 15 balls then you are getting there for it takes banking skills and down table positioning skills to get behind those down table balls and pick them off.

Practice Banks with a full rack one hour a day. Thanks again Keith you are right on about straight pool, a little slow and boring for 9-ballers but sure teaches you a lot! Whitey
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-23-2018, 03:43 PM
sausage sausage is offline
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 280
Default

i'm a straight pool guy but it's very hard to keep practicing that game by yourself. i've been doing so for over 30 years..... one of the greatest straight pool players of all time, Jimmy Rempe recommends a drill to improve your straight pool game. i've mentioned this before but i'm saying it again because it's the best practice drill of all time: scatter 15 balls evenly around the table keeping them away from the rails. then put the cueball anywhere and shoot them in without touching another ball nor a rail. Rempe suggests doing this for two weeks straight and "don't play no other pool".
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-23-2018, 06:41 PM
jalapus logan's Avatar
jalapus logan jalapus logan is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 203
Default

Fine advice here. I remember to try 14.1 from time to time and it really helps me in all the games, especially finessing the cue ball into pinpoint position. 9 and 10 feel easier after 14.1 practice and 8 ball too. Really improves breaking out clusters.

I'd love to run into the OP one day. Sausage too, he viewed one of my fledgling practice sessions online randomly. Would love to have a regular 14.1 sparring partner.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-27-2018, 10:53 AM
Drop Pocket's Avatar
Drop Pocket Drop Pocket is offline
Verified Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 99
Default

I've pushed this for years! There is nothing better for learning how break out clusters of even just a couple of balls and moving balls into more advantageous positions.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All original content Copyright Onepocket.org and/or the original author. All rights reserved.